kSsgiVuhzXi le 31/03/2015 à 15:52
Macmillan was actually manikg more money doing to Amazon’s way, because Amazon was paying the wholesale price on the higher list. Macmillan did this for the sole purpose of killing Kindle and perhaps ebooks in general.Macmillan doesn't intend to kill the kindle or ebooks. What they're concerned with, as was the case in music album sales through itunes and other online distributors is pricing control. Having actually worked in the digital music industry and seen this happen repeated numbers of times with a variety of distributors, and having spoken to people who work in publishing, I have a good sense of what's going on. I'm not sure what you're basing your speculation on, but you're dead wrong. You need to pause, and get real information from real sources. If you're speculating, you need to have prior behavior to base your speculation on. When I speculate, I'm basing that on past Amazon behavior in conflicts like this.Macmillan has removed the ability of retailers to set their own price. This has lots of bad effects on consumers. In the beginning, it means higher prices for ebooks from Macmillan and eventually the other six corporations that control publishing. And please don’t lecture me about elastic prices. Macmillan will not sell books for less than 10 bucks, ever. Even today, their listing at Fictionwise are almost overwhelmingly above ten dollars, even for books that have gone into paperback versions. ? Please check up on things like that. Seriously, if the Wheel of Time ebooks are listed at more than ten bucks a pop, there's a reason demand is high enough to support that price. If Zoe's tale lists at $7.99, retailing at $6.39 from Barnes and Noble, your assertion that Macmillan will not sell books for less than 10 bucks, ever. is wrong.I'm having a hard time taking this conversation seriously if you're just manikg things up to suit your snit at Macmillan for having a pricing strategy for ebooks you're not happy with. I think it's getting in the way of your ability to reason.But of course, this is all completely sidereal to the post John made Amazon is (still) cutting off sales of physical books. That's an issue that has nothing to do with digital pricing. If Negotiations broke down, all Amazon had to do was say Nope, that's not a deal we can accept, so we're not selling your ebooks anymore. Good luck with Apple, I hope we can continue doing business on physical books the same way. If they'd just done that, you and I wouldn't be having a conversation here. I wouldn't have cared one way or another.Instead, they escalated, and acted to hurt Macmillan in order to get them to comply to a policy Macmillan didn't want. And that's what this is about, not Macmillan's ebook pricing strategy. I also speculate that Amazon is doing this as a public warning to other publishers. But that's not something I can 100% prove. Still, it fits the evidence really well.


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